2017-2018 National High School Wrestling Rankings

Rank Year First Last Speaker Name Speaker ID City State WT Previous College
1
Sr.
Gable
Steveson
Gable Steveson
Apple Valley
MN
285
1
Minnesota
2
Sr.
Travis
Wittlake
Travis Wittlake
Marshfield
OR
182
4
Penn State
3
Sr.
Joey
Silva
Joey Silva
Lake Highland
FL
132
7
Michigan
4
Sr.
Jacori
Teemer
Jacori Teemer
Long Beach
NY
138
6
Arizona St.
5
Sr.
David
Carr
David Carr
Mass Perry
OH
160
11
6
Sr.
Brayton
Lee
Brayton Lee
Brownsburg
IN
152
HM
7
Sr.
Sammy
Sasso
Sammy Sasso
Nazareth
PA
145
HM
8
Sr.
Mason
Parris
Mason Parris
Lawrenceburg
IN
220
8
9
Jr.
Cohlton
Schultz
Cohlton Schultz
Ponderosa
CO
285
9
10
Sr.
Gavin
Hoffman
Gavin Hoffman
Montoursville
PA
195
12
Ohio State
11
Sr.
Michael
Beard
Michael Beard
Malvern Prep
PA
195
5
Penn State
12
Sr.
Seth
Nevills
Seth Nevills
Clovis
CA
285
10
Penn State
13
Sr.
Will
Lewan
Will Lewan
Montini
IL
152
HM
Michigan
14
Sr.
Aaron
Brooks
Aaron Brooks
N. Hagerstown
MD
182
13

Seven New #1s

What a show.

The first two and the last two matches at Who’s #1 in Bethlehem, PA, this past weekend were absolute fire. Not only were they dramatic, but they also represented four of the six times in the single dual meet in which a No. 1 fell.

While exciting on the mat, the action led to pure chaos in the pound-for-pound rankings and practically called for a reevaluation of the entire board. These results also force the negotiation of the ever-persistent question, "What do you value more: elite wins or fewest losses?"

Guys like David Carr and Sammy Sasso had slipped entirely out of the P4P based on several losses.

Carr’s 2016-17 losses: Julian Ramirez, Quentin Hovis, Jaden Mattox, Joe Lee, Brady Berge
Sasso’s 2016-17 losses: Jacori Teemer, Anthony Artalona, Brayton Lee, Anthony Ulaszek

Conversely, a guy like Seth Nevills never loses -- like ever. His last loss in freestyle or folkstyle was in eighth grade. At the same time, he hasn’t hit many of the elites.

As good as they are, I moved Gavin Teasdale and Roman Bravo-Young out. Both have been largely inactive -- with their last elite wins coming well over a calendar year ago. Malik Heinselman also falls out. Ultimately, the transaction is thus: RBY, Gavin, and Heinselman out; Sasso, Will Lewan, Brayton Lee in.

Now let’s talk order.

Silva has always been hurt by his FS losses and, since 2016, his lack of FS ledger. His last FS appearance saw losses to Keaton Geerts and Beau Bartlett -- among the worst losses of anyone on the board. But his Super 32s combined with WNO make him a solid No. 3 right now.

Teemer has a win over Sasso.

I’m not thrilled with how highly Mason Parris and Cohlton Schultz are ranked. They lack volume of quality wins. But Parris and Schultz split, and Schultz beat Hoffman.

Carr avenged two of his losses -- Mattox and Lee (twice).

Hoffman jumps Beard but remember: The former has a loss this year to Jakob Woodley, who was never in P4P nor ranked No. 1. Hoffman was also teched by Schultz in Fargo finals in 2016 and took losses at Disney Duals.

Sasso’s respective places at Super 32, Ironman, FloNationals, Akron, and Fargo in the past year: 1, 1, 1, 2, 5. Show me someone better in that regard. He also avenged a loss to Artalona (who won his last three in Fargo), and MAJORED Lewan, who won Akron, Fargo, and Cadet Worlds.

Nevills is a tough case. Ultimately, the entire "tier" of big men will be affected at Ironman, where Schultz and Nevills are expected to hit.

Brayton Lee is a very interesting case, having not won a major event in his entire career. But his list of wins over top five guys rivals just about anyone’s, highlighted by victories over Lewan, Sasso, Brock Hardy, and Alex Lloyd -- all in the top five. Additionally his losses are entirely acceptable -- Sasso, Jarod Verkleeren, and Jaime Hernandez.

Lewan is a new addition. He’s gone first in Akron, first in Fargo, and first at Cadet Worlds. Although his top 10 win list is short (Peyton Robb three times, Jared Franek twice, Dom Demas), his losses are few and far between and only to top five-ranked Sasso, Austin O’Connor, and Brock Hardy.

Aaron Brooks -- I know, I know. He appears to be far too low. And is it a contradiction based on his No. 3 class of 2018 ranking?

No. He’s not too low, and no, it’s not a contradiction. His 2018 ranking is based on our high expectations of him as a prospect. The ranking here is solely based on his win-loss ledger, which isn’t all that impressive.

He has just two top five wins (Hidlay/Ramirez) and some not-so-great losses, twice to Ethan Krause, and once to Nathan Atienza (7-0). He DNP’d at both 2015 Fargo and at last year’s S32.

And one glaring omission.

Kurt McHenry is an incredible talent, no doubt. I have all the confidence in the world, as reflected in the class of 2019 Big Board, that he will have a fantastic college and international career and, in the future, rise up the P4P board.

But from a W-L perspective, the ledger doesn’t stack up with the other 14 at this time. McHenry's best wins are over Heinselman and Julian Tagg, with losses to Jeremiah Reno, Brock Bergelin, Shane Hanson Ashworth, and Mike Colaiocco.

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